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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

1 edition of Occurrence of arsenic in groundwater near Cold Lake, Alberta found in the catalog.

Occurrence of arsenic in groundwater near Cold Lake, Alberta

by Richard Stein

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Published by Alberta Environment in [Edmonton] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Arsenic,
  • Groundwater,
  • Pollution

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRichard Stein, Marvin Dudas, Margaret Klebek
    ContributionsDudas, Marvin, Klebek, Margaret, Alberta. Alberta Environment
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 41 leaves :
    Number of Pages41
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25670583M
    OCLC/WorldCa65979327

    Any questions concerning the Alberta Water Well Information Database or Alberta Water Wells website can be directed to the Groundwater Information Centre . groundwater arsenic in the Mekong Delta aquifer system, and serves as a baseline for assessing future changes. In the process, it identified a regional-scale human-induced impact on arsenic mobilization and consequent contamination of groundwater. The new contamination mechanism proposed here, based on observations from the.

    Groundwater arsenic contamination occurs in generally oxidizing conditions in the High Plains and limited data indicate that arsenic is in the form of arsenate. Groundwater arsenic concentrations were compared with concentrations of other ions to evaluate potential arsenic sources. Correlations between arsenic and other constituents (vanadium. Treatment processes for removing arsenic are limited, so Health Canada has set the maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of arsenic in drinking water at milligrams per litre (mg/L). Since this guideline is higher than the level that’s considered no risk, try to keep arsenic levels in drinking water as low as possible.

    Arsenic in California's groundwater 80 10 o About 10 percent of wells exceed US EPA Maximum Contaminant Level Arsenic, in ug/L N = 1, Less than 15 15 to 30 o Greater than 15 California WRCB/USGS GAMA data 60 40 Arsenic, 1, in micrograms per liter Co-occurrence in groundwater from alluvial aquifers (US) (From Ayotte, et al., ). A high percentage (31%) of groundwater samples from bedrock aquifers in the greater Augusta area, Maine was found to contain greater than 10 μg L–1 of arsenic. Elevated arsenic concentrations are associated with bedrock geology, and more frequently observed in samples with high pH, low dissolved oxygen, and low nitrate. These associations were quantitatively compared by statistical analysis.


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Occurrence of arsenic in groundwater near Cold Lake, Alberta by Richard Stein Download PDF EPUB FB2

Occurrence and source of geogenic arsenic in groundwater from the Cold Lake-Beaver River Basin, Alberta Michael C. Moncur, S. Jean Birks, Emily Taylor, John J. Gibson Alberta Innovates-Technology. Occurrence and source of geogenic arsenic in groundwater from the Cold Lake-Beaver River Basin, Alberta Research (PDF Available) February with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Elevated arsenic concentrations have been observed in shallow groundwater in the Cold Lake Oil Sand Region of Alberta. The geology of this area includes up to m of unconsolidated glacial deposits, with six regional interglacial sand and gravel aquifers, underlain by marine shale.

This report provides information on the occurrence of arsenic in groundwater from domestic wells in the Lakeland Regional Health Authority (RHA), Aspen RHA, and Keeweetinok RHA in Northern Alberta. The report examines arsenic concentrations in relation to various underlying bedrock geological formations, seasons of the year, other trace metals.

Arsenic occurrence in Wisconsin Private well sampling Map - Beginning in the department has required arsenic sampling when pump work is done on existing wells. The map is from + samples collected over the first four and a half years. The map depicts the percent of wells over 10 ppb arsenic in each county - see tabular.

The goal of this book is to provide a description of the basic processes that affect arsenic occurrence and transport by providing sufficient background information on arsenic geochemistry and descriptions of hi- arsenic ground water, both affected and unaffected by human : Hardcover.

World-wide occurrences of arsenic–contaminated groundwater – Forms and toxicity. Arsenic (As) is a metalloid element (atomic number 33) with one naturally occurring isotope of atomic m and four oxidation states (-3, 0, +3, and +5) (Smedley and Kinniburgh, ).In the aqueous environment, the +3 and +5 oxidation states are most prevalent, as the oxyanions arsenite (H 3 AsO 3 or Cited by: Arsenic (As) concentrations as high as μg/L have been observed in shallow groundwater in the Alberta’s Southern Oil Sand Regions.

The geology of this area of Alberta includes a thick cover (up to m) of unconsolidated glacial deposits, with a number of regional interglacial sand and gravel aquifers, underlain by marine by: 8.

A Retrospective Analysis on the Occurrence of Arsenic in Ground-Water Resources of the United States and Limitations in Drinking-Water-Supply Characterizations Water-Resources Investigations Report 99– Arsenic in water f wells and springs Greater than 10 µg/L 5 to µg/L 3 to µg/L Less than µg/L EXPLANATION 0 MilesFile Size: 3MB.

Although dissolved arsenic (As) concentrations at Sites 1 and 2 did not exceed drinking water guidelines, elevated concentrations of this metal have been measured from groundwaters in other areas of the Beaver River Watershed (Alberta Health and Wellness, ; Lemay et al., ), therefore it was decided to also investigate As bearing mineral.

Arsenic and Uranium in Domestic Water Wells Domestic Water Wells Cold Lake-Beaver River Basin CIPHI 10 th. Annual Fall Educational Workshop. Edmonton, Alberta. Septem Brent Welsh, EIT. Regional Hydrogeologist. Alberta Environment, Northern RegionFile Size: 1MB.

Elevated arsenic (As > mg L − 1) in some domestic well water in the Cold Lake area of Alberta, Canada is of great concern for public determine possible sources of groundwater As, sediments (n = ) collected from five different locations (up to Cited by: 5.

Arsenic is a semimetal, or metalloid: its properties lie between those of metals and those of non-metals. It occurs naturally in the earth and in the seas. It is odourless and tasteless. Arsenic is an element (As) that occurs in the earth’s crust-rock, soil, all natural sources of exposure, or can be traced to deep water brines used to produce oil and natural gas.

groundwater or deep lake sediments (reducing environments). The solubility, mobility, and toxicity of As in the environment are dependent upon its oxidation state, and increase with increasing alkalinity and salinity. Arsenic mobility in groundwater is dependent on the physical and chemical properties of the aquifer, although.

groundwater or deep lake sediments (reducing environments). The solubility, mobility, and toxicity of As in the environment are dependent upon its oxidation state, and increases with increasing alkalinity and salinity.

Arsenic mobility in groundwater is dependent on. Groundwater in Alberta - An Assessment of Source, Use, and Change. Although many hydrogeologists will argue that much is already known about Alberta’s groundwater resources, the truth is that understanding and an appreciation for this resource is just emerging.

Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 Cited by: large, arsenic is apparently liberated from grain surfaces in significant quantities and transferred to the ground water.

Volcanic rocks and derived sediments, especially where altered to clay minerals, may be especially prone to yielding arsenic to groundwater under such conditions.

Natural Occurrence of Arsenic in Southwest Ground Water. Arsenic (As) is a metalloid element (atomic number 33) with one naturally occurring isotope of atomic m and four oxidation states (-3, 0, +3, and +5) (Smedley and Kinniburgh, ).

In the aqueous environment, the +3 and +5 oxidation states are most prevalent, as the oxyanions arsenite (H3AsO3 or H2AsO3- at pH ~) and arsenate (H2AsO4- and HAsO at pH ~) (Smedley and Kinniburgh. On the other hand, groundwater stays in contact with bedrock or soil material for decades or even centuries, allowing it to accumulate a much higher concentration of arsenic, if it’s present in the rock.

So that’s why arsenic is usually higher in groundwater than surface water. The thing is, not all groundwater sources are high in arsenic. Welch, A.H., Watkins, S.A., Helsel, D.R., and Focazio, M.J.,Arsenic in ground-water resources of the United States: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet4 p.

date range of data Complete None planned USGS Thesaurus Arsenic inlandWaters groundwater ISO Topic.Arsenic-contaminated groundwater is considered one of the world’s largest environmental health crises, as more than million people in more than one-third of countries worldwide are at risk of groundwater arsenic poisoning.

This book addresses how arsenic in groundwater impacts human health by.arsenic of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L). Water from some wells had arsenic concentrations greater than 60 µg/L. The sources of arsenic in the study area include (1) weathering of arsenic bear-ing minerals, (2) desorption of arsenic associated with iron and manganese File Size: 2MB.